Do ants have brains ? Yes, collective intelligence.

Do ants have brains - Collective intelligence

What is common among these three seemingly different but connected things – Ants, Birds and the Hollywood Movie, Lucy. Yes it is, Collective intelligence. Before we get into the subject of “Do ants have brains” we will understand briefly about collective intelligence.

Collective intelligence can be defined as

A shared or a group intelligence that is a result of collaborative, collective and coordinated efforts of individual members in a group.

We have known that general intelligence exists within individuals and can be correlated from various cognitive activities performed by individuals. The question is “Does Collective intelligence” also exist in the same levels for individuals in a social group or a social network?

Social networks have lives of their own depending on how we create them. They follow a cyclical pattern of creation, growth, rapid spread, global influence and long sustenance. Perhaps we can say that social networks can never die. We might be surprised to know that a social network thinks on its own and does its own independent actions.

The more we contribute the more it grows and each one of our contributions has a significant impact on the network as a whole and the network can collectively deliver where no one individual can do it alone.

Measuring collective intelligence – Learning from researchers.

There is overwhelming evidence and research that collective intelligence is so very important for a social group or a social network’s productivity and success.

MIT center for collective intelligence had published a report on “measuring collective intelligence” in a social group. It states that such intelligence is not about the individual intelligence in a group but it is about the sensitivity of the group as a whole, taking turns in the conversation for commenting, sharing opinions, ideas and answering to replies and the percentage of women in such groups.

The study shows a interesting finding that they have found a general collective intelligence factor called “c” . The factor is not related to the average or maximum intelligence of the individual team members but to the collective intelligence of the entire group.

The sensitivity of the group as a whole towards commenting, turn taking in responding, answering to group members as well as number of women in the group or social network.

There is lot of research that is going on with respect to the factors that affect collective intelligence in a social network. The number of women and the degree of collaboration that happens within that group has an impact on the collective intelligence of the group.

Do ants have brains ? What we learn from Ants, Birds, Fungi and the Hollywood movie – Lucy.

If you had seen the Hollywood movie “Lucy” you would be thrilled to the end. Good story line and movie direction of a slightly complex subject. Good direction by Director and Writer, Luc Besson.  The main protagonist Lucy, played by Scarlett Johansson gets transformed to a single invisible cell and disappears at the end.  In the movie, Lucy gets injected with a special super chemical which gives her brain the ability to use 100 % of its capacity, gradually. With this capacity she has the ability to transform herself and in this case into a single cell.  The individual cells in turn can act collectively together even though they are separated by space and time. Mind boggling isn’t it. Yes possible!

The movie is a worldwide hit but then it has received varied response from critics who say it is a misrepresentation of science.  But that’s something which we have not known and not experienced so far. We feel it is a distant possibility.

Garden ant and collective intelligence
Garden ant and collective intelligence

Let’s take an example of a colony of ants. The properties and super characteristics of a colony of ants is far more greater than an individual ant on its own. The amount of super co-coordinated effort a colony of ants can put together for reaching a bottle of jam is tremendous and they end up achieving it anyway.

This coordination is possible only when the ants are collectively acting together and not the feat of an individual ant. Such feats are the result of coordination and collective intelligence of many individuals. It is no ordinary feat that they build  huge ant hill all working together in a coordinated effort.

We human beings are multi cellular organisms. All the cells in the human body have their own individual properties, but then they all work together. By working together, they form a higher form of life called the human being.  This form is far more different and evolved than a single cell with its individual properties.

The bottom line is that we are essentially a huge bundle of cells (A few trillion cells approx.). According to the Smithsonian magazine there are about 37.3 trillion cells in the human body.

Another manifestation of the same phenomenon is about our thoughts. Our thoughts are not the product of a single neuron in the brain but a collective making of billions of neurons working together to create a pattern.

Such cooperative action and collective intelligence in social networks and in our society makes our civilization progress in leaps, allowing us to evolve with that wisdom.

The social network factor
Birds and Collective intelligence

Birds for example form a social network. When a flock of birds can collectively coordinate and determine the direction by combining the desires of each and every  bird in the flock, that’s real intelligence and you can say  that’s wisdom.

Another living thing, the fungi also behaves intelligently and collaboratively work together to find the best patch of ground to grow. It can even find the best path as well to reach it.

We have a lot to learn from the animal world.

End note

Image credit : Pixabay

Further reading resources :-

  1. Why some teams are smarter – New York times
  2. MIT centre for collective intelligence – MIT
  3. Collective hive mind – Science focus
  4.  Ants and brains – Reference
  5. When ants make decisions – Inside science
  6. Ants can navigate despite tiny brains – BBC

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